Published: 2019-06-26T10:00:00Z

1. When giving a child CPR what is the recommended ratio of rescue breaths to chest compressions?

2. What should you do if you suspect someone is having an allergic reaction?

3. You suspect a child has broken a bone, what action do you take?

4. What are the legal requirements for paediatric first aid cover in a workplace that offers childcare?

 

Answers below...

1. When giving a child CPR what is the recommended ratio of rescue breaths to chest compressions?

As soon as you identify that a child is 'unresponsive' and 'not breathing normally':
  • Give 5 initial rescue breaths before starting chest compressions
  • Then continue CPR at 30 chest compressions to two rescue breaths.
To understand more please take a look at CPR for Children and Babies  

2. What should you do if you suspect someone is having an allergic reaction?

Anaphylaxis is an extremely dangerous allergic reaction.  Common triggers are prescribed drugs, insect stings, nuts or seafood.  In anaphylaxis, a chemical called histamine is over-produced, causing one or more life-threatening airway, breathing or circulation problems.
 
Recognition
  • Blotchy skin rash or flushing (not always present)
  • A rapid onset of one (or more) life-threatening airway, breathing or circulation problems:
    • airway: blood capillaries can 'leak' causing swelling and blockage. Look out for swelling of the tongue, lips, throat or a feeling of the throat 'closing up'
    • breathing: wind-pipes can constrict just like asthma
    • circulation: blood vessels can dilate to three times their usual size, causing a life-threatening fall in blood pressure. Look out for dizziness, fainting, pale skin and a fast pulse.

Treatment

  • Call 999 for emergency help
  • Lay the casualty down in a comfortable position. If they feel light-headed or faint - do not sit them up. Raise their legs if necessary
  • If the casualty has airway of breathing problems only, they may prefer to sit up; but take extreme care - if they feel light-headed or faint, lay them down immediately
  • The casualty may carry an auto-injector of adrenaline. This can save their life if it is given promptly.  The casualty should be able to inject this on their own but, if necessary, assist them to use it
  • If the casualty becomes unconscious - check their airway and breathing and resuscitate if necessary
  • The dose of adrenaline can be repeated at 5-15 minute intervals if there is no improvement or symptoms return.

3. You suspect a child has broken a bone, what action do you take?

  • Immobilise the injury in the position you find it and keep the child warm.  Do not try to straighten a broken bone that is angulated
  • Call 999 if for emergency help if:
    • you suspect injury to the spine or head
    • they experience difficulty breathing or reduced circulation beyond the injury
    • there is deformity, irregularity, unnatural movement or bone through the skin
    • the child is in a lot of pain
    • you need help to safely immobilise the injury and transport the child
  • If you call 999, just keep the injury still and cover open wounds with a dressing
  • If you do not need an ambulance, splint/ support the injury to immobilise it before transport to hospital. Pad inside any splint and check circulation beyond it.

4. What are the legal requirements for paediatric first aid cover in a workplace that offers childcare?

The Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) Statutory Framework requires all early years providers in England to have at least one person who has a current and full paediatric first aid certificate on the premises and available at all times when children are present. Providers should also take into account the number of children, staff and layout of the premises and increase their paediatric first aid provision accordingly to ensure that a paediatric first aider is available to respond to emergencies quickly.
 
Our Ofqual accredited Paediatric First Aid courses meet:
  • the requirements of the Early Years foundation stage statutory framework
  • Ofsted requirements for registered childminders, pre-school staff, nursery nurses
  • the requirements for nannies under the Approved Carers Scheme.

For more information see Paediatric First Aid

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